Dog training can be very intimidating to someone that has never done it before. You can have information overload when you think of all the resources you have at your disposal. Read on for some simple, basic tips arranged to help you get started.

A good plan when training your dog is to keep your sessions short. When you have multiple, short sessions of training, as opposed to one long set, your dog will stay interested and will anticipate more. Keeping your pet motivated by short interval sessions will be effective and have a stronger impact.

Never leave a tied dog unattended for long lengths of time. Even the best trained dog can become excited and active enough that they snarl up their chain or rope around and around itself or another object. If you don’t catch this in time your dog could actually twist his collar tight enough that he suffocates.

As you plan out your dog training sessions, focus on only teaching your pet one new skill at a time. Too many instructions and expectations can cause your dog to become confused and frustrated. You will achieve much better results if you work on one skill, achieve mastery and then move on.

Training sessions for your dog should be fun and stress-free. Your dog will learn better, and you will be able to teach better in a positive environment. Use your training session as a bonding time with your dog and have fun. This will help you and your dog have a life-long relationship.

When training your dog to walk on a leash, remember that your dog should follow where you lead, not the other way around. Dogs are pack animals, and the leader of the pack always travels in front. You want your dog to see you as the leader, so they need to learn to walk behind you.

Next time your dog jumps up on you in excitement, tell them “Off” in a firm (but not angry) voice, gently push them off, and turn your back. The verbal command and action of moving them reinforces what the command means, and turning restricts their access to you. This accomplishes two things: a) your dog can’t jump on you anymore, b) your dog feels he loses your attention, which is the exact opposite of what he wants. This teaches him quickly not to jump on you.

Dogs usually respond well to physical rewards when being trained. Almost all dogs have an extremely large capacity for love. That makes them respond very well to rewards like belly scratching, back petting and brushing. Your dog wants to be loved and greatly appreciates you giving him affection. Show your happiness with his success this way.

Toilet training is as much your responsibility as theirs. Watch for signals that your dog has to go out to relieve himself. Common behaviors include snuffling, whining, and pacing around. When this happens, take action immediately. Put your dog on a leash and take him where he should go. Whenever he relieves himself in an appropriate time and place, he should be praised immediately. He will soon learn how to ask for the bathroom.

Utilizing the fore-mentioned tips can enable you to curb common training problems and misconceptions. Properly training your pooch can result in a happier, reduced stress life for the both of you.